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secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan to not miss it. this is not somethin
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
feel like they can go ahead. so texas first. maybe alabama. maybe mississippi. maybe north carolina after today. sometimes you use the bully pulpit. sometimes you have the authority to weigh in and stop something directly. sometimes when you lose that authority, as justice department did during the, with the voting rights act case. sometimes when you lose that authority, you instead decide you're going to sue. what is the range of options available to you? and how do you use it? how do you still try to make progress when some avenues toward the progress you want to make are blocked? on the issue of drugs and criminal justice, the obama administration made it a priority to try to reduce the huge disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. i mean, if cocaine is the problem, why be so much more lenient for one variety of cocaine and so much more strict for the other? o on that issue, the administration found a lot of allies in congress. the build to reduce those sentencing disparities between crack cocaine and powder cocaine, that bill passed by a voice vote in the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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